Original Research

Medication adherence and blood pressure control amongst adults with primary hypertension attending a tertiary hospital primary care clinic in Eastern Nigeria

Gabriel U.P. Iloh, John N. Ofoedu, Patrick U. Njoku, Agwu N. Amadi, Ezinne U. Godswill-Uko
African Journal of Primary Health Care & Family Medicine | Vol 5, No 1 | a446 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/phcfm.v5i1.446 | © 2013 Gabriel U.P. Iloh, John N. Ofoedu, Patrick U. Njoku, Agwu N. Amadi, Ezinne U. Godswill-Uko | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 20 March 2012 | Published: 25 February 2013

About the author(s)

Gabriel U.P. Iloh, Department of Family Medicine, Federal Medical Centre, Umuahia, Abia State, Nigeria
John N. Ofoedu, Department of Family Medicine, Federal Medical Centre, Umuahia, Abia State, Nigeria
Patrick U. Njoku, Department of Family Medicine, Federal Medical Centre, Umuahia, Abia State, Nigeria
Agwu N. Amadi, Department of Public Health Technology, Federal University of Technology, Nigeria
Ezinne U. Godswill-Uko, Department of Anaesthesiology, Federal Medical Centre, Umuahia, Abia State, Nigeria


Share this article

Bookmark and Share

Abstract

Background: As the case detection rates of hypertension increase in adult Nigerians, achieving target blood pressure (BP) control has become an important management challenge.

Objectives: To describe medication adherence and BP control amongst adult Nigerians with primary hypertension attending a primary care clinic of a tertiary hospital in a resource-poor environment in Eastern Nigeria.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 140 adult patients with primary hypertension who have been on treatment for at least 6 months at the primary care clinic of Federal Medical Centre, Umuahia. A patient was said to have achieved goal BP control if the BP was < 140 per 90 mmHg. Adherence was assessed in the previous 30 days using a pretested researcher-administered questionnaire on 30 days of self-reported therapy. Adherence was graded using an ordinal scoring system of 0–4; an adherent patient was one who scored 4 points in the previous 30 days. Reasons for non-adherence were documented.

Results: Adherence to medication and BP control rates were 42.9% and 35.0% respectively. BP control was significantly associated with medication adherence (p = 0.03), antihypertensive medication duration ≥3 years (p = 0.042), and taking ≥ one form of antihypertensive medication (p = 0.04). BP at the recruitment visit was significantly higher than at the end of the study (p = 0.036). The most common reason for non-adherence was forgetfulness (p = 0.046).

Conclusion: The rate of BP control amongst the study population was low, which may be connected with low medication adherence. This study urges consideration of factors relating to adherence alongside other factors driving goal BP control.


Keywords

adherence; control; Hypertension; Nigeria; primary care

Metrics

Total abstract views: 5243
Total article views: 11393

 

Crossref Citations

1. Evaluation of antihypertensive adherence and its determinants at primary healthcare facilities in rural South Africa
Enos M Rampamba, Johanna C Meyer, Brian Godman, Amanj Kurdi, Elvera Helberg
Journal of Comparative Effectiveness Research  vol: 7  issue: 7  first page: 661  year: 2018  
doi: 10.2217/cer-2018-0004