Original Research

Perceptions of women towards screening for intimate partner violence

Akintunde O. Akinyugha, Adebusola Akinyugha, Adesola O. Kareem, Abiodun J. Kareem, Modupe O. Ajewole, Elohor J. Orji, Adedeji Ogedengbe, Festus R. Babalola, Ruth O. Ayodele, Olawale J. Oladimeji
African Journal of Primary Health Care & Family Medicine | Vol 14, No 1 | a3527 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/phcfm.v14i1.3527 | © 2022 Akintunde O. Akinyugha, Adebusola Akinyugha, Adesola O. Kareem, Abiodun J. Kareem, Modupe O. Ajewole, Elohor J. Orji, Adedeji Ogedengbe, Festus R. Babalola, Ruth O. Ayodele, Olawale J. Oladimeji | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 09 March 2022 | Published: 14 September 2022

About the author(s)

Akintunde O. Akinyugha, Department of Family Medicine, Federal Medical Centre, Owo, Nigeria
Adebusola Akinyugha, Registry Unit, Federal University of Technology, Akure, Nigeria
Adesola O. Kareem, Department of Community Medicine, Federal Medical Centre, Owo, Nigeria
Abiodun J. Kareem, Department of Paediatrics, Federal Medical Centre, Owo, Nigeria
Modupe O. Ajewole, Department of Family Medicine, Federal Medical Centre, Owo, Nigeria
Elohor J. Orji, Department of Family Medicine, Federal Medical Centre, Owo, Nigeria
Adedeji Ogedengbe, Department of Family Medicine, Federal Medical Centre, Owo, Nigeria
Festus R. Babalola, Department of Family Medicine, Federal Medical Centre, Owo, Nigeria
Ruth O. Ayodele, Department of Family Medicine, Federal Medical Centre, Owo, Nigeria
Olawale J. Oladimeji, Policy and Communication Unit, Academy for Health Development, Ile-Ife, Nigeria


Share this article

Bookmark and Share

Abstract

Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is an under-diagnosed public health problem affecting women with attendant negative bio-psycho-social ramifications, and unfortunately there is no universally agreed recommendation for routine hospital IPV screening currently.

Aim: This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of IPV among women and their perceptions towards screening.

Setting: The study was carried out in a hospital in Southwest, Nigeria.

Methods: The study was a descriptive, cross-sectional study of 347 consenting women. Respondents were recruited using systematic random sampling. Data were collected using questionnaire adapted from the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Multi-Country Study Questionnaire on Women’s Health and Domestic Violence against women. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used and a p-value < 5% was considered significant.

Results: The prevalence of IPV among the sample was 71.2%. The most common IPV pattern was controlling behaviour (49.6%) while sexual violence (19.6%) was the least. The majority (85.0%) of the respondents agreed that routine IPV screening should be done for women while 96.5% believed that it would enable doctors to help identify victims. The belief that it will help physicians in making a correct diagnosis, shared by 10.7% of the respondents, was statistically significant (odd ratio [OR] = 2.592, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.180–5.694, p-value = 0.018). A total of 37 respondents (10.7%) were about three times more likely to have experienced IPV than others.

Conclusion: There was a high prevalence of IPV and the women are open to routine hospital IPV screening, with the belief that it will help physicians to make an accurate diagnosis of IPV.

Contribution: This research was done by majority of family health specialists, in Nigeria, an African country. The focus of the research was distinctly with an African perspective, in the field of family medicine which has a public health implication and effect on the community.


Keywords

intimate partner violence; perception; prevalence; screening; women.

Metrics

Total abstract views: 228
Total article views: 136


Crossref Citations

No related citations found.