Original Research

Knowledge and attitudes relating to cervical and breast cancer among women in Maseru, Lesotho

Maseabata M. Ramathebane, Mopa A. Sooro, Richard M. Kabuya, Abdul-Rauf Sayed
African Journal of Primary Health Care & Family Medicine | Vol 14, No 1 | a3459 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/phcfm.v14i1.3459 | © 2022 Maseabata M. Ramathebane, Mopa A. Sooro, Richard M. Kabuya, Abdul-Rauf Sayed | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 01 February 2022 | Published: 14 December 2022

About the author(s)

Maseabata M. Ramathebane, Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health Sciences, National University of Lesotho, Maseru, Lesotho
Mopa A. Sooro, Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health Sciences, National University of Lesotho, Maseru, Lesotho
Richard M. Kabuya, Senkatana Oncology Clinic, Maseru, Lesotho
Abdul-Rauf Sayed, Bristol Meyer Squibb Foundation, Cape Town, South Africa

Abstract

Background: Cancer has remained one of the leading causes of death worldwide. In Lesotho, breast and cervical cancers contribute about 43% of all the cancer cases annually.

Aim: This study is aimed at comparing knowledge, attitudes, and practices between breast and cervical cancers among females in Maseru.

Settings: This study consists of women residing in five study sites which have clinics that offer cervical and breast cancer-screening services.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in June 2021 in Maseru, the Capital city of Lesotho. The participants were interviewed using a pre-tested questionnaire, through which their knowledge, practices about, and attitudes towards breast and cervical cancers were assessed.

Results: A total of 228 women aged 15–75 years participated in the study and the majority were aged 30 years and above. Of the women interviewed for cervical cancer, 89.5% had heard of it, 11.8% had heard of its screening, and 7.4% had at least one examination. Similarly, for breast cancer, 77.6% of women who had heard of it, 72.9% had heard of screening, and 40.1% of women did at least one examination.

Conclusion: The majority of women were more knowledgeable about cervical cancer than breast cancer. However, more women had heard about breast cancer screening than cervical cancer screening. Therefore, there is a need for awareness campaigns related to cervical cancers’ screening.

Contribution: There is an urgent need to intensify awareness about cervical and breast cancer screening and availability of services at the nearby clinics.


Keywords

cross-sectional; breast cancer; cervical cancer; knowledge; attitudes; cancer screening; Lesotho.

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Crossref Citations

1. More recent insights into the breast cancer burden across BRICS-Plus: Health consequences in key nations with emerging economies using the global burden of disease study 2019
Sumaira Mubarik, Lisha Luo, Mujahid Iqbal, Nawsherwan, Jianjun Bai, Chuanhua Yu
Frontiers in Oncology  vol: 13  year: 2023  
doi: 10.3389/fonc.2023.1100300