Original Research

Knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of pharmacy and nursing students towards male circumcision and HIV in a KwaZulu-Natal University, South Africa

Panjasaram V. Naidoo, Farzana Dawood, Christine Driver, Magdalene Narainsamy, Sikhanyiso Ndlovu, Victor Ndlovu
African Journal of Primary Health Care & Family Medicine | Vol 4, No 1 | a327 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/phcfm.v4i1.327 | © 2012 Panjasaram V. Naidoo, Farzana Dawood, Christine Driver, Magdalene Narainsamy, Sikhanyiso Ndlovu, Victor Ndlovu | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 20 June 2011 | Published: 11 July 2012

About the author(s)

Panjasaram V. Naidoo, School of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
Farzana Dawood, School of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
Christine Driver, School of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
Magdalene Narainsamy, School of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
Sikhanyiso Ndlovu, School of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
Victor Ndlovu, School of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa


Share this article

Bookmark and Share

Abstract

Background: Male circumcision is currently being promoted in South Africa as a Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) prevention method. Effective implementation requires that healthcare providers should believe in the procedure’s efficacy and should possess a positive attitude. A study was undertaken amongst pharmacy and nursing students with different objectives.

Objectives: To ascertain students’ knowledge, attitudes and perceptions regarding male circumcision and (HIV) prevention.

Method: A descriptive cross-sectional study using anonymous questionnaires was undertaken amongst 4th year pharmacy and nursing students studying at a university in KwaZulu-Natal, after obtaining their consent. Data were captured and analysed using SPSS version 15.

Results: A response rate of 83.18% and a mean knowledge score of 66.43% with relatively positive attitudes (62.7) were obtained; 85.4% of the respondents felt that promoting male circumcision is appropriate, with all Muslim students (n < 11) supporting the promotion of male circumcision. Even though all Muslim students supported male circumcision, only 3 students were willing to perform the procedure if adequately trained (p < 0.03). The majority of the female students were unwilling to perform the procedure (p < 0.005). A third of the respondents indicated that male circumcision would both undermine existing protective behaviours and strategies as well as increase riskier sexual behaviour. Over 54% of the respondents believed that the South African Health System would be able to cope with the massive male circumcision drive. The majority of the respondents favoured the procedure to be done at birth. Pain was cited as the most important reason for not wanting to be circumcised.

Conclusion: Pharmacy and nursing students have a moderate knowledge of male circumcision and HIV prevention with relatively positive attitudes. The majority felt that promoting male circumcision is appropriate and should be encouraged.


Keywords

attitudes; HIV/AIDS; knowledge; male circumcision ;nursing; pharmacy ; students.

Metrics

Total abstract views: 5236
Total article views: 14164

 

Crossref Citations

1. ‘Just kidding. I'm white!’ knowledge, perceptions and attitudes of white and Indian male university students towards HIV prevention
Phebbie Mboti, Nyasha Mboti
Communicatio  vol: 42  issue: 1  first page: 119  year: 2016  
doi: 10.1080/02500167.2016.1145711