Short Report

Misrepresentation about vaccines that are scaring women

Jagidesa Moodley, Olive P. Khaliq, Princess Z. Mkhize
African Journal of Primary Health Care & Family Medicine | Vol 13, No 1 | a2953 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/phcfm.v13i1.2953 | © 2021 Jagidesa Moodley, Olive Khaliq, Princess Z. Mkhize | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 22 February 2021 | Published: 09 June 2021

About the author(s)

Jagidesa Moodley, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Clinical Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa
Olive P. Khaliq, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Clinical Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa
Princess Z. Mkhize, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Clinical Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa


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Abstract

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has contributed greatly to morbidity and mortality worldwide. The production of COVID-19 vaccines has been tested for efficacy and safety via clinical trials. However, false information on the side effects of the vaccine has been spread via social media, creating fear of vaccination. Currently, the vaccine has been falsely reported to cause infertility in women of reproductive age and miscarriages in pregnant women. There is no evidence to support this information as the COVID-19 vaccines have been clinically approved for safety. Furthermore, pregnant and lactating women were not included in the clinical trials. Therefore, the objective of this report is to raise awareness that the rumours on the vaccine are false and to encourage every individual to accept the vaccination for their safety and the safety of their loved ones.

Keywords

misrepresentation; vaccines; infertility; Social media; COVID-19

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Crossref Citations

1. A lesson from MMR: is choice of vaccine the missing link in promoting vaccine confidence through informed consent?
J O’Neill
Ethics & Behavior  first page: 1  year: 2022  
doi: 10.1080/10508422.2022.2059757