Original Research

Clinical presentation and hospitalisation duration of 201 coronavirus disease 2019 patients in Abuja, Nigeria

Isaac O. Akerele, Adaeze C. Oreh, Mohammed B. Kawu, Abubakar Ahmadu, Josephine N. Okechukwu, Danjuma N. Mbo, Doris J. John, Faridah Habib, Matthew A. Ashikeni
African Journal of Primary Health Care & Family Medicine | Vol 13, No 1 | a2940 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/phcfm.v13i1.2940 | © 2021 Isaac Olubanjo Akerele, Adaeze Chidinma Oreh, Mohammed Babautiya Kawu, Abubakar Ahmadu, Josephine Nnebuko Okechukwu, Danjuma Nkami Mbo, Doris Japhet John, Faridah A Habib, Matthew Abu Ashikeni | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 20 February 2021 | Published: 27 October 2021

About the author(s)

Isaac O. Akerele, Department of Family Medicine, Asokoro District Hospital COVID-19 Isolation and Treatment Centre, Federal Capital Territory Administration, Abuja, Nigeria
Adaeze C. Oreh, Department of Planning, Research and Statistics, National Blood Transfusion Service, Federal Ministry of Health, Abuja, Nigeria
Mohammed B. Kawu, Faculty of Health and Human Services Secretariat, Federal Capital Territory Administration, Abuja, Nigeria
Abubakar Ahmadu, Department of Anaesthesia, Faculty of Health and Human Services Secretariat, Federal Capital Territory Administration, Abuja, Nigeria
Josephine N. Okechukwu, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health and Human Services Secretariat, Federal Capital Territory Administration, Abuja, Nigeria
Danjuma N. Mbo, Department of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Maitama District Hospital, Federal Capital Territory Administration, Abuja, Nigeria
Doris J. John, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health and Human Services Secretariat, Federal Capital Territory Administration, Abuja, Nigeria
Faridah Habib, Department of Family Medicine, Nisa Premier Hospital, Abuja, Nigeria
Matthew A. Ashikeni, Faculty of Health and Human Services Secretariat, Federal Capital Territory Administration, Abuja, Nigeria


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Abstract

Background: Knowledge of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is unfolding. Insights from patient features in different environments are therefore vital to understanding the disease and improving outcomes.

Aim: This study aimed to describe patient characteristics associated with symptomatic presentation and duration of hospitalisation in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients managed in Abuja.

Setting: The study was conducted in Abuja, the Federal Capital Territory, Nigeria.

Methods: This was a retrospective study of 201 COVID-19 patients hospitalised in the Asokoro District Hospital COVID-19 Isolation and Treatment Centre between April 2020 and July 2020. Demographic and clinical data were obtained and outcomes assessed were symptom presentation and duration of hospitalisation.

Results: Patients’ median age was 39.3 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 26–52); 65.7% were male and 33.8% were health workers. Up to 49.2% of the patients were overweight or obese, 68.2% had mild COVID-19 at presentation and the most common symptoms were cough (38.3%) and fever (33.8%). Hypertension (22.9%) and diabetes mellitus (7.5%) were the most common comorbidities. The median duration of hospitalisation was 14.4 days (IQR: 9.5–19). Individuals with secondary and tertiary education had higher percentage symptoms presentation (8.5% and 34%, respectively), whilst a history of daily alcohol intake increased the length of hospital stay by 129.0%.

Conclusion: Higher educational levels were linked with symptom presentation in COVID-19 patients and that daily alcohol intake was significantly associated with longer hospital stay. These findings highlight the importance of public education on COVID-19 for symptom recognition, early presentation and improved outcomes.


Keywords

coronavirus disease 2019; COVID-19; SARS-CoV-2; presentation; duration of hospitalisation; hospital stay; patient education; Abuja; Nigeria

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