Original Research

Parental reporting of adverse drug reactions in South Africa: An online survey

Shavani Pillay, Mwila Mulubwa, Michelle Viljoen
African Journal of Primary Health Care & Family Medicine | Vol 13, No 1 | a2880 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/phcfm.v13i1.2880 | © 2021 Michelle Viljoen | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 18 December 2020 | Published: 29 September 2021

About the author(s)

Shavani Pillay, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Bellville, South Africa
Mwila Mulubwa, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Bellville, South Africa
Michelle Viljoen, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Bellville, South Africa

Abstract

Background: The high incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in children is of global concern. Enhancing the reporting of ADRs could contribute to making safer medicines available to children.

Aim: To assess parents’ awareness of reporting ADRs and their knowledge on the reporting procedures in South Africa.

Setting: South African parents with online access.

Method: A quantitative descriptive study was conducted based on an anonymous voluntarily web-based self-administered questionnaire that was distributed through Facebook® and LinkedIn™ to parents in South Africa.

Results: The questionnaire was completed voluntarily by 206 respondents. The majority of participants (70.9%) were aware of the term ADR. Significant associations between not being aware of the term ADR and single marital status, lower education level, not having private medical aid and accessing public clinics for medical services were found. The majority (66.5%) of participants did report an ADR to a healthcare professional whilst only 15% reported it to a product manufacturer. More than half of the participants (58.7%) knew how to report ADRs whilst 72.8% knew what type of ADRs to report. Almost a third (32.5%) did not know where more information on ADR reporting could be found or how ADRs could be reported (31.5%).

Conclusion: The majority of the respondents were aware of the term ADR, indicative of a good knowledge basis on which ADRs to report and the importance of reporting ADRs. However, gaps in the respondents’ knowledge were identified which highlighted specific groups of individuals to be targeted to increase ADR awareness and improve the knowledge on the reporting process.


Keywords

adverse drug reactions; spontaneous reporting; patient reporting systems; parental reporting; pharmacovigilance

Metrics

Total abstract views: 1751
Total article views: 2574

 

Crossref Citations

1. Adverse drug reactions: To report, or not to report?
M Viljoen, Gl Muntingh
South African General Practitioner  vol: 3  issue: 2  first page: 52  year: 2022  
doi: 10.36303/SAGP.2022.3.2.0118