Original Research

Caregiver burden and associated factors amongst carers of women with advanced breast cancer attending a radiation oncology clinic in Nigeria

Ikechi E. Jite, Adedotun A. Adetunji, Ayorinde M. Folasire, Joshua O. Akinyemi, Segun Bello
African Journal of Primary Health Care & Family Medicine | Vol 13, No 1 | a2812 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/phcfm.v13i1.2812 | © 2021 Ikechi E. Jite, Adedotun A. Adetunji, Ayorinde M. Folasire, Joshua O. Akinyemi, Segun Bello | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 20 October 2020 | Published: 15 June 2021

About the author(s)

Ikechi E. Jite, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria
Adedotun A. Adetunji, Department of Family Medicine, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria
Ayorinde M. Folasire, Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
Joshua O. Akinyemi, Department of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Faculty of Public Health, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
Segun Bello, Department of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Faculty of Public Health, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria


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Abstract

Background: The responsibility of caring for patients with advanced cancer in sub-Saharan Africa is mostly shouldered by family members because of paucity of institutional facilities. There is a growing concern that the number of women needing treatment for advanced breast cancer is rising at an unprecedented rate in Nigeria.

Aim: To assess the caregiver burden and its associated factors amongst family caregivers of women with advanced breast cancer.

Setting: The study was conducted at the radiation oncology clinic of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted amongst 157 eligible family caregivers of women with advanced breast cancer. The family caregivers completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire, which included the socio-demographic data, the caregiving process and the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI). Logistic regression was used to identify factors, and ethical approval was obtained.

Results: Over half (53%) of the respondents were males with spousal caregivers dominantly constituting 27.4% of all respondents, closely followed by daughters (25.5%) of the care recipients. The mean ZBI score was 29.84 ± 13.9. Most (72%) of the caregivers experienced burden. Factors associated with caregiver burden were previous hospitalisation of the care recipient (odds ratio [OR] = 3.74, confidence interval [CI]: 1.67 to 8.38) and perceived dysfunction in patients activities of daily living (OR = 2.57, CI: 1.14 to 5.78).

Conclusion: Family caregivers of women with advanced breast cancer experience burden of care. Recognition of this vulnerable population and the care recipient as a dyad is a sine qua non in mitigating the burden associated with their caregiving role.


Keywords

family caregivers; caregiver burden; Zarit Burden Interview; advanced breast cancer; Nigeria

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