Original Research

The conceptualisation of patient-centred care: A case study of diabetes management in public facilities in southern Malawi

Martha Makwero, Adamson Muula, Felix C. Anyawu, Jude Igumbor
African Journal of Primary Health Care & Family Medicine | Vol 13, No 1 | a2755 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/phcfm.v13i1.2755 | © 2021 Martha Thokozani Makwero | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 06 September 2020 | Published: 20 September 2021

About the author(s)

Martha Makwero, Department of Family Medicine, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Malawi, Blantyre, Malawi; and, Department of Public Health, School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
Adamson Muula, Department of Public Health, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Malawi, Blantyre, Malawi
Felix C. Anyawu, Department of Public Health, School of Health Sciences, University of Venda, Limpopo, South Africa; and, Faculty of Health Sciences, Dora Ngiza Provincial Hospital, Port Elizabeth, South Africa, South Africa
Jude Igumbor, Department of Public Health, School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

Abstract

Background: Patient-centred care (PCC) is one of the pillars of Malawi’s quality of care policy initiatives. The role of PCC in facilitating quality service delivery is well documented, and its importance may heighten in chronic disease management. Yet, PCC conceptualisation is known to be context specific.

Aim: The study aimed to understand the conceptualisation of PCC amongst patients, healthcare providers (HCP) and policy makers in Diabetes Mellitus (DM) management.

Setting: This study was conducted in DM clinics in Southern Malawi.

Methods: Our qualitative exploratory research study design used in-depth and focus group interviews. We interviewed patients with DM, HCPs and policy makers. The study used framework analysis guided by Mead and Bower’s work.

Results: Patient-centred care conceptualisations from groups of participants showed convergence. However, they differed in emphasis in some elements. The prominent themes emerging from the participants’ conceptualisation of PCC included the following: meeting individual needs, goals and expectations, accessing medication, supporting relationship building, patient involvement, information sharing, holistic care, timeliness and being realistic.

Conclusion: Patient-centred care conceptualisation in Malawi goes beyond the patient–HCP relational framework to include the technical aspects of care. Contrary to the global view, accessing medication and timeliness are major elements in PCC conceptualisation in Malawi. Whilst PCC conceptualisation is contextual, meeting expectations and needs of patients is fundamental.


Keywords

patient-centred care; diabetes mellitus; conceptualisation; elements perceptions; chronic care; quality of care; patient involvement

Metrics

Total abstract views: 1922
Total article views: 2854

 

Crossref Citations

1. Nurse managers' perceptions of patient‐centred care and its influence on quality nursing care and nurse job satisfaction: Empirical research qualitative
Dominic Abugre, Busisiwe R. Bhengu
Nursing Open  vol: 11  issue: 1  year: 2024  
doi: 10.1002/nop2.2071