Original Research

Development and validation of a tool to measure patient experience in chronic disease care

Nayna Manga, Richard Harding, Angela de Sa, Kathleen Murie, Mosedi K. Namane, Peter J. Raubenheimer, Derek A. Hellenberg, Elma de Vries
African Journal of Primary Health Care & Family Medicine | Vol 10, No 1 | a1830 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/phcfm.v10i1.1830 | © 2018 Elma de Vries, Nayna Manga, Richard Harding, Angela de Sa, Kathleen Murie, Mosedi Keanetse Namane, Peter Johann Raubenheimer, Derek Adriaan Hellenberg | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 24 May 2018 | Published: 11 September 2018

About the author(s)

Nayna Manga, Division of Family Medicine, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town, South Africa
Richard Harding, Centre for Global Health Palliative Care, King’s College London, United Kingdom
Angela de Sa, Division of Family Medicine, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town, South Africa; and Retreat Community Health Centre, Cape Town, South Africa
Kathleen Murie, Cape Town Metro District Health Services, Western Cape Department of Health, South Africa
Mosedi K. Namane, Division of Family Medicine, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town, South Africa; and Vanguard Community Health Centre, Cape Town, South Africa
Peter J. Raubenheimer, Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Cape Town, South Africa
Derek A. Hellenberg, Division of Family Medicine, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town, South Africa
Elma de Vries, Division of Family Medicine, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town, South Africa; and Heideveld Community Health Centre, Metro District Health Services, South Africa


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Abstract

Background: There is a global increase in the prevalence of non-communicable diseases and a growing understanding that patients need to be involved in their care. Patient experience should be assessed and the information used to improve on the planning and delivery of health services.

Aim: This study described the development and validation of a patient-reported experience measure (PREM) tool which is appropriate for the South African context, to assess self-reported patient experience of chronic care.

Setting: The study was conducted at four primary health care facilities in the Cape Town Metropole.

Methods: This was a validity and reliability study with multiple phases to develop and determine the psychometric properties of a novel tool. It consisted of three phases, namely: Phase 1 – Consensus Validity; Phase 2 – Face Validity; Phase 3 – Reliability. Phase 1 consisted of an expert panel reaching consensus on a draft tool. Phase 2a consisted of qualitative semi-structured interviews and cognitive interviews. Phase 3 tested the internal consistency of the tool, the time necessary to complete, as well as floor and ceiling effects with 200 questionnaires.

Results: The process described resulted in a final questionnaire with n = 10 items in three languages that was easily understood by patients. Internal consistency was determined with the overall Cronbach’s alpha 0.86. This PREM has been named Chronic Care Assessment of Patient Experience.

Conclusion: Using best practice guidance in tool construction and validation, we delivered a PREM with the potential to improve the quality of care from the perspective of patients. Implementation studies are now required to determine how best to use this tool in routine practice.


Keywords

patient experience; patient-reported experience measure; non-communicable diseases

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