Review Article

Faith-based organisations and HIV prevention in Africa: A review

Rachel Mash, Robert Mash
African Journal of Primary Health Care & Family Medicine | Vol 5, No 1 | a464 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/phcfm.v5i1.464 | © 2013 Rachel Mash, Robert Mash | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 16 June 2012 | Published: 30 May 2013

About the author(s)

Rachel Mash, Division of Family Medicine and Primary Care, Stellenbosch University, South Africa
Robert Mash, Division of Family Medicine and Primary Care, Stellenbosch University, South Africa


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Abstract

Background: Faith-based organisations (FBOs) are potentially an important role-player in HIV prevention, but there has been little systematic study of their potential strengths and weaknesses in this area.

Objectives: To identify the strengths and weaknesses of FBOs in terms of HIV prevention. The questions posed were, (1) ‘What is the influence of religion on sexual behaviour in Africa?’,and (2) ‘What are the factors that enable religion to have an influence on sexual behaviour?’.

Method: A literature search of Medline, SABINET, Africa Wide NIPAD and Google Scholar was conducted.

Results: The potential for Faith-based organisations to be important role-players in HIV prevention is undermined by the church’s difficulties with discussing sexuality, avoiding stigma, gender issues and acceptance of condoms. It appears that, in contrast with high-income countries, religiosity does not have an overall positive impact on risky sexual behaviour in Africa. Churches may, however, have a positive impact on alcohol use and its associated risky behaviour, as well as self-efficacy. The influence of the church on sexual behaviour may also be associated with the degree of social engagement and control within the church culture.

Conclusion: Faith-based organisations have the potential to be an important role player in terms of HIV prevention. However, in order to be more effective, the church needs to take up the challenge of empowering young women, recognising the need for their sexually-active youth to use protection, reducing judgemental attitudes and changing the didactical methods used.


Keywords

HIV;AIDS, Prevention; Faith Based Organisations; Sub-Saharan Africa; Religiosity

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Crossref Citations

1. The relationship between moral intervention strategies and the stigmatisation of people living with HIV – A Christian perspective
Izak J. Van der Walt, Jacobus M. Vorster
HTS Teologiese Studies / Theological Studies  vol: 72  issue: 3  year: 2016  
doi: 10.4102/hts.v72i3.3384